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Category: Trust News

Annual Project Co-ordinators Report

Predator Trapping  - During the past year we have been successful in using funding from the Regionals Council’s EEF and from DOC to consolidate and extend our predator control.  We have a long term plan of extending a perimeter of traps around the Manawahe corridor margins and we have made progress towards achieving that goal. Progress report on trapping extension Eastern Boundary - Braemar Road runs North- South along the base of the Manawahe escarpment and forms the eastern boundary of the Manawahe corridor. We have divided this into two blocks, Braemar South which runs up to the Tumarau wetland and Braemar [...]

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Annual Education Report

I started in the role of Environmental Educator for the Manawahe Eco Trust on the 29th of October 2018. It has been an exciting and busy year. We had no schools booked for the end of 2018.  This was good as it gave me time to understand the programmes at Manawahe and also come up with some ideas of my own.  It was also a great time to market the centre. In 2019 schools have been involved in various different programmes encompassing many different activities - there has been 15 schools over 35 days, with 584 students and 157 adults accompanying [...]

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June/July 2019 Report

Education Report   It has been another busy month up at the Ecological Centre. We have had three groups from Trident High school all doing slightly different things.  They have had a problem-solving team building day for a group of Year 13 and Year 10 students, as well as a three-day camp with a group of students that are preparing for a five week trip the Great Barrier Island later in the year. The final group of students were doing an assessment in which they did a four-hour adventure race on the roads and farms around the centre. Whakatane Intermediate Environmental class has also [...]

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History

After the war, large areas of forest were felled for wood and then burned off to create farms for returning soldiers and their families. However in some cases only the biggest trees were taken and the remnant bush left. In this way approximately 4000 hectares of native forest around Manawahe were retained. About half of this is found on private land in the corridor. The bush type in the corridor is predominantly Rimu- Rata/ Tawa-Kamahi with Rewarewa thriving in situations where the other dominant canopy trees are struggling. The understory of the well protected areas resembles fairytale books with nikau, ferns, [...]

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